Country of Origin: United States
  • Activity Level: moderate
  • Grooming Level: low
  • Trainability: high
  • Adaptability: moderate
  • Kid/Pet Friendly: often
  • Average Size: Large
  • Average Lifespan: 8-12 years
  • Prey Drive: low
  • Watchdog: chill
  • Registered?: other

American Bully Breed Profile

Overview

Temperament

Adaptability

Health

Owner Experience

Grooming

Activity Level

Size

Life Span

Did You Know?

The American Bully is a companion breed that originated in the United States in 1990. The American Bully Kennel Club was formed in 2004 as the breed gained recognition and became more established. Although the AKBC is an official registry for the American Bully worldwide, they also recognize other bulldog breeds.

The American Bully is similar to the American Staffordshire Terrier in that they were bred specifically for stability, loyalty, and improved physical characteristics and to diminish traits like the dog aggression or gameness their ancestors were prized for. Although the American Bully is similar in appearance to the American Staffordshire Terrier, they tend to have a sturdier and heavier bone structure.

The American Bully may look intimidating, but they are a companion breed that loves their family, bonds closely with them, and is affectionate towards them. They tend to be confident dogs with a friendly nature and an energetic personality. They tend to have a gentle demeanor and get along fantastically with children.

American Bullies also tend to get along well with strangers, other dogs, and other animals. Any aggression towards humans or dogs or shy or reserved behavior is not characteristic of the breed. Should these behaviors appear in an American Bully, they are generally the result of poor socialization or poor training and are not breed-related.

An American Bully is a moderately adaptable dog breed. They can do well in both larger homes as well as apartments as long as they get enough exercise. They do tend to be active indoors, but will be fine without a yard to run around in as long as you can give them the activity they need.

As a short-coated dog without a lot of insulation, these dogs tend to prefer warmer climates. However, as a brachycephalic (snub-nosed or flat-faced) dog, they are very sensitive to heat. So, you will need to be cautious and watch them carefully as the temperatures rise.

When temperatures drop, they may need some help staying warm. Having the right mix of winter dog products on hand can be a big help when you have to venture out in the cold together. Because the American Bully is a social dog that thrives on attention from their family and bonds closely with them, they do not like to be left alone for long periods of time.

As with any dog breed, there are some potential health concerns to be aware of. For the American Bully, these potential health issues include hip dysplasia, cleft palate, luxating patella, skin conditions, progressive retinal atrophy, cataracts, and hypothyroidism.

Reputable breeders will screen their breeding stock to avoid passing on detectable issues to puppies. So, don’t be afraid to talk to them about the genetic and health history of both of the parents. You can also ask about any relevant health tests or clearances.

Although the American Bully can get bored easily and can sometimes have a bulldog stubborn streak, they are a highly trainable dog that can be a good fit for first-time owners.

These dogs are highly intelligent and eager to please their owners, so they tend to pick up on things quickly. Puppy training classes are still recommended as these classes often offer opportunities to socialize a puppy.

The American Bully has a smooth, short coat that will shed moderately year-round. Weekly brushing and the occasional bath is all this dog’s coat needs to stay healthy and looking great. You can also do a quick wipe or rubdown with a towel or chamois between baths to freshen them up or just to give their coat a nice gleam.

In addition to coat care, you will also need to care for your American Bully’s nails, ears, and teeth. Monthly nail trimming is usually sufficient to keep nails from growing too long. But, you may need to cut your dog’s nails more often if they aren’t wearing down as much on their own or they just tend to grow quickly.

Checking ears weekly and carefully cleaning your dog’s ears as needed can help prevent ear infections. You are checking to make sure your dog’s ears are clean, dry, and free of debris and pests. If you see redness, irritation, excess wax or moisture, or something else that is concerning, you know it’s time to visit the vet.

It’s also important to take care of your dog’s teeth. This is something many dog owners overlook, which is why gum disease is one of the most common health issues in dogs. By practicing good dental care for dogs, you can help prevent dental diseases later in life. Brushing teeth or using an enzyme toothpaste every day is ideal. You can also talk to your vet about good options for dental hygiene chews and work with them to create a “dental care diet” for your pooch.

The American Bully has a moderate activity level. Daily walks plus some playtime are usually enough for this stocky dog. They also love having a job to do.

They may be up for more activity if you are and will love spending time with you being active. Just keep an eye on them to make sure they’re not overexerting themselves!

A fully-grown American Bully usually stands somewhere between 13-21 inches tall and weighs 70-120 pounds. Weight and height vary greatly within the breed because there are four categories for the American Bully – Pocket, Standard, Extra-Large (XL), and Classic. Although weight and height may vary between these categories, proper proportions are extremely important.

An American Bully generally lives 8-12 years.

In addition to the American Bully Kennel Club, the American Bully is also recognized by the American Canine Association, Inc., Dog Registry of America, Inc., Backwoods Bulldog Club, United Canine Association, United Kennel Club, and European Bully Kennel Club.