Designer Breed Icon
  • Activity Level: moderate
  • Grooming Level: high
  • Trainability: high
  • Adaptability: moderate
  • Kid/Pet Friendly: often
  • Average Size: Small
  • Average Lifespan: 12-17 years
  • Prey Drive: low
  • Watchdog: aware

Forever Breed Profile

Overview
Temperament
Adaptability
Health
Owner Experience
Grooming
Activity Level
Size
Life Span
Did You Know?

A Forever Puppy is a mixed dog breed that maintains a puppy-like look and size throughout its life. In general, it’s popular for the parent breeds to be low-shedding dogs as this has the best potential of yielding puppies that are also low-shedding. Some popular parent breeds for Forever Puppies include Bichon Frise, Miniature Poodles, Shih-Tzu, Cavapoo, Cavachon, Cockapoo, Cockachon, and more. The most popular parent breed mixes for a Forever Puppy are a Cavapoo and Cavachon, a Cavachon or Cavapoo and Mini Poodle, or a Cavapoo and Bichon Frise.

The Forever Puppies from these parent breed combinations are also sometimes referred to as a Cavapoochon or Cava-poo-chon. Because Forever Puppies can come from various combinations of parent breeds, it’s important to talk to the breeder about the parent breeds of the litter when you’re looking at a Forever Puppy. This will give you a better idea about what to expect in the particular Forever Puppy you’re interested in.

The dog breeds generally used as parents for the Forever Puppy are all people-oriented. They love their families and tend to get along well with children, other dogs, and other pets. Due to their small size, they can be easily injured by accidental falls or rough play, so playtime with young children should be closely supervised. They can make good watchdogs as they will let you know when someone is nearby, but they don’t make good guard dogs as they are more interested in making friends with everyone.

In general, Forever Puppies have a sweet disposition and playful nature. They will thrive on human attention and affection and will love spending time with people, especially their families. Due to the general affability of the parent breeds, they also usually make good candidates for therapy dogs.

This mixed dog breed is moderately adaptable. They will do well in homes of any size and are a great fit for apartment living. They will also do well in most climates, but can be sensitive to heat and may need some extra help staying warm while out on walks in the cold. Because they are so in-tune with people, they don’t do well with long periods of alone time.

Some potential health issues to be aware of in a Forever Puppy are similar to that of other small dog breeds. These potential health conditions include hip dysplasia, eye disorders, epilepsy, and patellar luxation. Asking the breeder about the genetic history of the parents and to see any health clearances can help allay potential health concerns.

Due to the potential parent breeds in the mix, the Forever Puppy is likely to be highly trainable and a good fit for owners of any experience level. They should be highly intelligent, sensitive, and eager to please, which means they will pick up on things quickly as long as training stays positive and reward-based.

This dog breed likely will not respond well to harsh tones or corrections. They may also have a slight stubborn streak at times, so don’t be afraid to enroll in puppy training classes. Because of their small size, there is a possibility that housebreaking will be difficult. So, crate training can be a good idea during the training phase and be sure to bring plenty of patience.

Because the Forever Puppy is meant to be a low-shedding mixed breed, you shouldn’t have to worry too much about shedding. However, the coat will often be either wavy, curly, or very curly, so you will need to brush this dog’s coat at least a few times a week, if not every day, to prevent tangles and mats. You will also likely need to get your Forever Puppy professionally groomed about every 4-6 weeks, especially if you are keeping their coat longer or trying to maintain a “show clip”.

In addition to coat care, you will also need to trim your dog’s nails, take care of their ears, and clean their teeth. Usually, trimming your dog’s nails monthly is sufficient to keep them from getting too long and hindering movement. Checking your dog’s ears regularly and carefully cleaning them as needed can help prevent ear infections. This is especially important with floppy-eared dogs, as ears that drop down are more likely to trap dirt, debris, and moisture than ears that don’t.

It’s also important to care for your dog’s teeth. Dental disease is one of the most common health issues in dogs, and it’s also the most preventable. Proper dental care for dogs, like brushing your dog’s teeth or using an enzyme toothpaste every day, goes a long way in protecting your dog’s teeth and gums from painful disease. You can also use dental hygiene chews and a specially-formulated dental diet to help supplement your efforts.

Generally, it’s a good idea to get your dog used to having their mouth, paws, and ears handled as a puppy and reward them during grooming sessions. This keeps grooming sessions a positive experience and helps to make grooming a much easier process throughout your dog’s life.

A Forever Puppy will tend to have a moderate energy level. They will enjoy playtime and likely have bursts of energy, but they’re small, so they may tire out quickly. A few walks a day plus some playtime will be plenty of activity for this pup. They may also adjust their energy to your lifestyle, so they might be up for more activity if you are more active. They’re definitely not a good running partner and won’t be competing in marathons anytime soon, but they might be up for a short swim, some hiking, a trip to the dog park, or even some dog sports like agility, obedience, and rally.

Depending on the parent breeds, a Forever Puppy usually stands 9-12 inches tall at the shoulder and weighs between 9-18 pounds.

A Forever Puppy will generally live 12-17 years.

A Forever Puppy is also called a Cavapoochon and is sometimes referred to as a CPC. They are also sometimes called a TRI-mixed breed as they are often the result of a King Charles Spaniel and Bichon Frise Mix and a Miniature or Toy Poodle.