5 Things to Know About Vizsla Puppies

vizsla puppies - vizsla dog lying on a benchIf you’re thinking about adopting a puppy, there are a wide array of things to consider. Dogs can vary significantly from breed to breed, and not just in their looks. Their personalities, needs, and preferences all depend highly on what kind of dog they are. If a Vizsla has caught your eye, here are a few facts to help you make your decision:

Dog Breed Specs

Vizsla puppies grow into a mid-sized dog, usually averaging 23 inches tall and about 60 pounds. They have short, sleek coats that are typically copper in color. Vizslas only require basic grooming to stay happy and clean. They have long ears, and are sveltely built. If they’re well cared for, Vizslas will have an average lifespan between 10 and 14 years.

Vizslas Are Talented

Records dating back to the 9th century mention Vizslas and their overall prowess in hunting. In fact, this breed is considered dual purpose – a pointer and a hunter. Sometimes, they are even utilized for retrieval. Vizslas are excellently suited for hunting fowl in general, and upland game in particular.

Because of their versatility, and impeccable memories, Vizslas served as messenger dogs during World War I. Interestingly enough, they almost went extinct due to their proficiencies. Admirers of the breed revitalized their numbers and brought them back from the brink.

High Energy

Vizslas have extraordinary levels of energy. They are happiest when in the thick of a hunt, or on the fourth lap of a run. These are not the kind of dogs that remain stationary. They’ll run an obstacle course and chase rabbits for you, but they just can’t sit still.

Vizslas are intelligent, and easily trainable, so they will be overjoyed to complete puzzles or play with intricate toys. As long as they’re busy and active, they’re happy! At minimum, one hour of vigorous activity per day, every day for this pup is recommended.

Generally Healthy

Vizslas are generally a healthy dog breed, but may suffer from a few specific health issues. For example, Vizslas may develop: eye disorders, hypothyroidism, blood clotting disorders, and epilepsy as they age. If you’re considering adopting a Vizsla, make sure to get him checked out regularly by his veterinarian.

Don’t Like Alone Time

This breed is not a fan of solitude. When paired with their need for activity, Vizslas can become destructive if left alone for too long. That’s not to say that they are needy – in fact, they can be very independent – but they’d prefer their human to be nearby.

For people who work long hours, or have small living quarters, the Vizsla may not be a good match. Often, they will go right for the shoes if they aren’t stimulated enough. However, with enough flexibility, and outside time, they will try their hardest for their human.